Training 4 Carers Ltd

Completing the CWDC workbook 'Ordinary People Doing Extraordinary Things'

Completing the CWDC workbook 'Ordinary People Doing Extraordinary Things'


CWDC Workbook

Those of you who have attended our many workshops across England will be aware of our view that whoever developed this title probably has very little understanding of the many challenges faced by foster carers in their day to day tasks of caring for a range of children. Many children have very complex needs that require high level skills, understanding, patience, emotional and physical availability and at times a dogged determination to provide the children that they care for with the best opportunity do develop into independent adults

It is not just the children that they look after who create challenges for foster carers. They also have to work within agency, local authority and national guidelines, policies and procedures that on occasions are interpreted in differing ways both individually and corporately, which causes confusion and frustration for the children that they care for, their birth families and them as individuals. There are also a range of other professional agencies and individuals that are involved in their day to day lives, which on occasions leaves many carers feeling somewhat exposed and vulnerable

Ordinary people, give us a break, we consider that for many carers to notion of 'extraordinary people' would be an understatement given the level of the tasks expected from many of them. It is our experience that many carers have clearly demonstrated their ability to provide for the care of some of the most vulnerable and demanding children and young people in our society. However many are finding it difficult to provide evidence of their skills and understanding to complete the CWDC workbooks



We hope that the information within this section of our website will assist carers to provide evidence to complete the 'signing off' of their workbooks and to assist supervising social workers and others to understand what CWDC expect from carers



Completing the workbooks

From our training presentations throughout England, we are receiving feedback from many carers that they are finding the concept of completing the CWDC Workbooks a daunting task. We hear that his task is being made more difficult by what many carers and social workers consider to be the complicated and confusing manner in which the workbook has been written. To add further complication, it appears that some supervising social workers have a misunderstanding of the CWDC requirements and are expecting foster carers be able to answer complex exam style questions and to complete reams of essay style writing before the social workers are prepared to 'sign off' the workbooks. This is not what is expected by CWDC and the CWDC workbook page 7, paragraph clearly states 'it is not intended that you have to write exam-type answers to these questions'. Page 10, final paragraph states that 'assessment is not an exam. Your supervising social worker should use forms of assessment that best suit you'.

The workbook is clear that there are many ways in which carers can demonstrate that they meet the requirements of the standards, including but not limited to, discussions with supervising social workers and others, including other carers, attending training, reading, attending support groups, previous work and caring experience


Terminology used within the workbook

From our time with carers it appears that the area of greatest confusion is possibly the use of the 'Induction Plan' terminology. Many carers have informed us that they find it difficult to understand what this really means and is causing them to 'have a mental block' which results in procrastination and feeling unable to progress any further with the workbook. Having read the workbook I can understand what it is trying to achieve. On page 7, it states that the Induction Plan' column is where 'you and your supervising social worker can write what you are going to do and find out, and what evidence you are going to collect to prove you are able to meet this requirement'

It is our experience that many supervising social workers also have confusion regarding what is required from them, which is compounded by the fact that may of them have never received any training, or have any direct experience in the supervision, mentoring and facilitating learning process. This results in them avoiding the issue of the workbooks, and / or being unable to assist the carers who they supervise, to plan how they are going to gather evidence to demonstrate that they meet the standard. Thus for many carers and supervising social workers the workbooks are not getting started

It is our opinion that it may be helpful if carers and supervising social workers started by exploring what evidence carers can demonstrate now and then developing a plan of what more may be required to meet the standard and how they might gain the evidence. It is our experience that many experienced carers already have the skills and knowledge to meet many of the requirements to meet the standards

During many of our training sessions, we have devoted the final 15 - 20 minutes to assisting carers to consider what evidence they can demonstrate that supports their meeting the CWDC standards. It is our experience that the majority of carers are able to provide a reasonable verbal demonstration of evidence, which suggests to us that with some assistance, encouragement and prioritising some time, they will be able to complete the workbooks, probably without too much difficulty


Our suggested plan to start gathering and presenting evidence


Those of you who attend our training are aware of our firm belief in the principal of KIS 'Keep It Simple' whenever possible. We are going to provide a brief explanation of how we believe KIS can help you getting started and providing some evidence for your workbook

We suggest that you do not look at the workbook at this stage, especially if you are finding it confusing or daunting but start by following the stages a - c.


a) Write a list of the training that you have attended. Use as few words as possible, eg: Attachment Separation and Loss, Bullying, Child Protection (Safeguarding and Promoting Welfare) Contact and Working With Birth Parents etc. Collate all of your certificates and letters of attendance to show your SSW

b) Write a brief list of the different tasks involved in your present and past work, eg: attending meetings, behaviour management, consulting and communicating with others (schools, specialist services, birth parents and significant others) educating children, facilitating contact etc. Collate any written information to support your experience and expertise

c) Write a brief list of the different needs of children that you have cared for, eg: ADHD, bulling (perpetrators or victims) communication difficulties, Dyslexic etc

d) We are now going to consider some evidence to demonstrate your ability to meet CWDC Standard 1 'Understanding the principals and values essential for fostering children and young people'


S1: Understand the principals and values essential for fostering children and young people


1) Principals and values

Guiding principal: The Children Act 1989 section 1: 'The child's welfare is paramount'


Look at your list of training that you have attended

What training have you attended that developed your understanding of this concept, we suggest that you have probably attended some of the following training that can start to demonstrate you understanding of this principal:


Attachment Separation and Loss (understanding the implications of early life experiences for childrens development and emotional functioning and care needs)

Bullying (focussing on the child's needs whether perpetrator or victim and maintaining a respectful approach)

Child Protection (SAPW) legislation including Children Act 1989 and 2004, 5 outcomes 'SHAPE', potential implications of abuse and neglect for childrens development, agency policies and procedures,

Contact and working with birth families and significant others (understanding why children may require looking after, roles and responsibilities for foster carers, respectful communication, understanding needs of family, communication theory and techniques)

Developing and contributing to planning process (assessment and identifying childrens needs, attending meetings, advocating for children.

Consider the children that you have cared for / are currently caring for and some examples of how you meet this requirement, they could include:


Advocating for children
Allowing children to explore and play whilst being mindful of potential risks
Assisting children to develop and understand their identity
Attending meetings
Being available for children and others at times of duress
Communicating in a respectful manner with children and others significant for them
Facilitating contact
Protecting children from potential harm

Make some brief notes of above within page 15 of your workbook and discuss with supervising social worker at you next supervision session.

If SSW believes that you have demonstrated that you meet the standard they can sign off the standard

If you agree that further evidence is required, identify how you will gain it and make a note of this in the Induction plan. This could include attending some training, support group, discussion with SSW or other, guided reading or Internet research.

Agree dates to gather evidence if appropriate and when you will meet with SSW to discuss further


Was that process really that difficult?

Follow the KIS process for the rest of the workbook

It does not need to be followed in any order, look at what areas you are confident in first to help you to get used to the process of completing the workbook

After the standards you will find a list of training sessions that you might have attended and experience that you might have gained that should assist you in completing the CWDC workbooks


2) Equality, Inclusion and ADP
3) Person centred approaches
4) Confidentiality and sharing information


S2: Understand your role as a foster care

1) Legislation, policies and procedures
2) Relationships with parents and others
3) Team working
4) Being organised
5) Complaints and procedures


S3: Understand health and safety and healthy caring

1) Legislation, policies and procedures
2) Accommodation
3) Health care and medication
4) Personal safety and security
5) Risk assessment


S4: Know how to communicate effectively

1) Encourage communication
2) Communication styles
3) Communicating with parents, families and friends
4) Communicating with organisations
5) Principals of good record keeping



S5: Understand the development of children and young people

1) Attachment and stages of development
2) Resilience
3) Transitions
4) Supporting play, activities and learning
5) Supporting educational potential
6) Understanding contexts (abuse, sociological, family networks)
7) Promote positive sexual health and identity
8) Supporting disabled and SEN children


S6: Safeguard children and young people and keep them safe from harm

1) Legislation, policies and procedures, keeping children safe
2) Recognising and responding to abuse
3) interagency working
4) Whistle blowing’ reporting failures in duty


S7: Develop yourself

1) Your role and approval as a foster carer
2) Impact of fostering on your family
3) Using support and supervision
4) Meeting your learning needs and Continued Professional Development (CPD)
5) Career progression

All CWDC information from www.cwdccouncil.org.uk





Information regarding our training sessions and evidence to meet / work towards meeting the CWDC standards



Attachment, separation, loss and bereavement (standards 1 - 6 especially 5)


The aims of this training are to assist social care workers and managers to gain a greater understanding of attachment theory in relation to a range of issues within the care of 'Looked After Children'.

The training also considers how the theory can be used to understand adult interpersonal development (personality) and potential influence within relationships and work settings


The objectives to achieve the aims will include:

Assessment of attachment patterns (young people and adults)
Behaviour management and planning
Developing, evaluating and re formulating plans
Personal understanding and development
Understanding loss and the grieving process


Bullying (standards 1 - 7 especially Standards 4 - 6)

The aims and objectives of the training are to define, explore and consider the causes and consequences of bullying for both victims and perpetrators and to formulate strategies to detect and prevent potential incidents and re-occurrence

Definitions and distinctions
Actions
Causes and consequences
Signs and symptoms
Own Actions and experiences
Reasons for bullying / victimization
Disclosure and acceptance
Supporting children
Problem solving (perpetrators and victims)


Care Standards Act (2000) awareness (S 1- 7 especially S 1 and 2)

The aims and objectives of the training are to: assist residential staff, foster carers and supervising social workers to develop their awareness of the National Minimum Standards, from the Care Standards Act 2000, in relation to the provision of care for looked after children.



Caring for carers (S 7)

The aims objective's of this training are to assist social care workers from all levels and professions to explore and understand the potential implications of their work for their emotional, physical and social wellbeing and to develop strategies to ensure their self care


Child Protection (Safeguarding and Promoting Welfare) S1 -7) especially S 6

The objectives of these workshops are for childcare staff from all levels to develop awareness of the signs and symptoms associated with child abuse and neglect and of the policies, principals and practices that are in place to protect children and to promote safe care for all. The training sessions includes information on:


Children Act 1989 / 2004, Human Rights Act 1998 and Sexual Offences Act 2004
Signs symptoms and consequences of abuse and neglect
Children with disabilities
Child development
Risk assessment
Policies, procedures and process
Multi-agency and team co-ordination and co-operation
Practice methods
Recording and reporting
Working with families
Supervision, consultation and accountability
Self awareness and self care
Team working
Values and norms
HIV and AIDS
Complaints and representations



CP (SAPW) and Safer Caring refresher (S 1 - 7)

The objectives of these workshops are for childcare staff from all levels to develop awareness of the signs and symptoms associated with child abuse and neglect and of the policies, principals and practices that are in place to protect children and to promote safe care for all. The training sessions includes information on:


Children Act 1989 / 2004, Human Rights Act 1998 and Sexual Offences Act 2004
Signs symptoms and consequences of abuse and neglect
Children with disabilities
Child development
Risk assessment
Policies, procedures and process
Multi-agency and team co-ordination and co-operation
Practice methods
Recording and reporting
Working with families
Supervision, consultation and accountability
Self awareness and self care
Team working
Values and norms
HIV and AIDS
Complaints and representations


Communicating with young people (S 1 - 7 especially S 4 - 6)

The objectives for this training session are to assist people who work with and care for children to develop knowledge, skills and techniques to communicate effectively with children who have experienced difficulties.


The training included aspects of:

Accountability
Anger
Behaviour (understanding and management)
Communication styles and techniques
Confidentiality
Decision making (carers and young people)
Influences
Interpersonal functioning
Meetings and formal speaking
Problem solving
Promoting health and welfare
Reporting and recording


Direct work with young people (S 1 - 7 especially 4 and 5)


The aims and objectives of the training are to:

Assist childcare workers and carers to develop their understanding of the theoretical influences and practical applications, regarding a range of direct working techniques

The training included:

Consultation, supervision and support
Definitions
History and development
Methods and techniques
Planning
Positives and risks
Theory, practice and experience



Facilitating contact and working with birth parents (S 1 - 7)

The aims and objectives of the training ware to:

Assist foster carers, residential staff and social workers to understand the complex dynamics of identity development and contact between looked after children and significant people in their lives

The training includes:

Contact methods, functions and venues
Feelings and perceptions
Identity and origins
Moving home
Positives and pitfalls
Reasons for being looked after
Rehabilitation to birth family
Values and social norms
Working in partnership



Management and supervision in social care (basic level)


This training session is primarily for supervisors and senior staff who have a basic experience working within a supervisory capacity. The objectives of the day are to develop a theoretical and practical understanding regarding concepts and applications of the management and supervisory process, within the context of care provision for children

The training includes information on:

Accountability
Communication
Facilitating change
Fairness and respect
Management theory
Managing management
Supervision and consultation
Supervision contracts
Support and survival (self care)



Identifying and managing stress within social care ( S 1 - 7 especially S 7)

The aims and objective for this training session are to assist people who work within the social care profession, to explore, identify and understand the neuro-physiological implications of stress for themselves and others. The training also identifies individual strategies that act to reduce or manage stress and the significance of perspective and lifestyle



Observation and assessment (S 1 - 7 especially S 2 - 7)


The aims and objective for this training session are to assist social care workers to gain a greater understanding of observation and assessment theory and practice



The training includes information on:

Assessment process and practice
Confidentiality
Observation
Problem solving, including bias, influence, fact and opinion
Recording and reporting process and guidelines



Parent and child assessment: Mother and baby fostering and residential (S 1 - 7)


This training session is for staff of all levels that are involved in parent and child fostering / residential work, including foster carers, residential workers, support workers, day care staff and supervising social workers and manager

The training aims to assist the development of the knowledge, skills and methods required to undertake this complex and at times difficult and demanding work



Complexity and dynamics
Contact arrangements
Contract / written agreement
Objectivity and reliability, influences and bias
Practice models and guidelines
Presenting reports and giving evidence
Purposes and principals
Supervision and consultation
Writing skills and practices



Placement planning and evaluation ( S 1 - 7 especially S 2 - 6)

The aims and objectives for this training workshop, were to assist residential social care workers and managers to gain a greater understanding of the process and practice of developing placement plans for looked after young people

The training included information on:

Assessment process and practice
Behaviour management and planning
Confidentiality
Consultation and supervision
Developing, evaluating and re formulating placement plans
Inclusive practice
Multi-agency / disciplinary working
Roles and responsibilities within planning process


Preparation for Independence (S 1 - 7 especially S 5 and 6)


The aims and objectives of the training are to:


Understand the government's directives regarding assisting young people to develop independence and to raise awareness of the concept of independence, the difficulties facing ‘looked after young people’ and how they can be assisted to prepare for adult life

The (Children) Leaving Care Act 2000
Skills, knowledge and experience
Roles and responsibilities
Functions of childhood
Child development
Sexuality and sexual knowledge
Young people with disabilities
Implications of abuse and neglect
Pathway Plans
Education, training and employment
Future support
Living independently, process and prognosis


Recording and reporting (S 1 - 7 especially S 4, 4, 6 and 7)

The aims and objective for this training workshop, are to assist social care workers to gain a greater understanding of the recording and reporting process and to increase skills

The training includes information on:

Accountability
Confidentiality
Legal and professional responsibility
Observation and assessment
Principals and practice in recording and reporting
Problem solving, including bias, influence, fact and opinion
Reflection on practice
Writing style, processes and formats



Roles and responsibilities within social care (S 2, 4, 6 and 7)


The aims and objectives of this session are to assist social care staff from all levels to consider, reflect on and understand their individual, team, organisation and multi-agency corporate roles and responsibilities within the children's social care profession


Safer caring and promoting welfare (S 1 - 7)

The objectives of these workshops are for childcare staff from all levels to develop awareness of the policies, principals and practices that are in place to protect promote safer caring for young people and their carers and support staff.

The training sessions includes information on:



Children with disabilities
Child development
Complaints, allegations and representations
Legislation
Risk assessment
Policies, procedures and process
Multi-agency and team co-ordination and co-operation
Practice methods
Recording and reporting
Working with families
Supervision, consultation and accountability
Self awareness and self care
Team working
Values and norms



Time Management (S 2and 7)


The aims and objectives of this training session to assist people from all professions and disciplines to reflect on their practice and to consider how their time can be used more effectively and efficiently

The training includes aspects of:

Action planning
Barriers to effectiveness (self and others)
Consequences of ineffective time management
Delegation and responsibility
Managing management and workload
Reasons for managing time
Strategies for positive change
Strengths and areas to address
The working day and what consumes time



The 5 Outcomes (Every Child Matters) S 1 - 7


The aims and objective for this training workshop are to assist people who work within the child care profession, to explore, identify and understand the governments direction of working towards 'The 5 Outcomes'

Stay Safe
Be Healthy
Enjoy and Achieve
Make a Positive Contribution
Have a Good Standard of Living



Understanding and working with difficult to manage behaviour (S 2 - 7)

The aims and objectives for this training session, are to assist people who work within the caring profession, to explore, identify and understand the complexity of behaviours and how they may be managed and changed. The training will focus on developing techniques and strategies to help vulnerable people to behave in a manner deemed as ‘more socially acceptable’, thus reducing what is perceived as potential risk to themselves and others

Behaviours
Causes and consequences
Child development
Definitions and distinctions
Own actions and experiences
Strategies and management
Values and norms



Understanding and working with emotional and mental health difficulties (S 4 - 6)

The aims and objectives of this training session are for carers and support workers to identify symptoms that may indicate that a child has a mental health / emotional problem. The training also explores a range of possible strategies and actions to minimise the possible impact of the condition for the children, their carers and others.

Consultation and accountability
Team working
CMH Definitions
Possible causation
Identifying conditions / disorders



Understanding and working with sexuality (S 1 - 7 especially S 2 - 7)

The aims and objectives of the training are to:

Develop understanding and awareness of the complex concepts of sexuality, in relation to the provision of care for looked after children. The training session includes information on:


Attraction theory
Child development
Communication
Consent
Deviance
Disability
Discrimination
Education
Gender
Legislation
Sexual acts, preferences and choice
Sexual health
Values, social norms and cultural influences


Values, rights and principals of social care (S 1 - 7)

The aims and objectives of this training session is to assist all people that work within the children's social care profession to develop their theoretical and practical understanding of this complex area. The training is somewhat challenging to popularist beliefs and current child care practice and procedures and includes:

Ability and perceptions
Historical development
Implications for practice
Influence and bias
Legislation, policies and procedures
Media and political influence
Play and child development
Risk, fear and reality (implications for practice and child care)
Values and social norms (self and others)
What has changed and what does it all mean


Valuing / Working with difference / ADP / Cultural Competence (S 1 - 7 esp S 1)


The aims and objectives of the training are to:

Assist social care workers to develop their awareness of the concepts of valuing and working with difference and disadvantage, in relation to the provision of care for looked after children. The training session included information on:


Assumptions regarding culture

Definitions and distinctions
Disability and disadvantage
Discrimination and lack of understanding
Diversity and difference
Gender and sexuality
Influence of institutions / organisations
Service delivery and development
The complexity of culture, own and others
Values and social norms
When cultures interact


Working with children who have been sexually abused (S 1 - 7)

The aims and objectives are to assist people who work with and care for children who have been sexually abused, to develop knowledge, skills and methods to help them to understand and work unconditionally with young people and strive minimise the impact of their abusive experiences




Further information for reference when completing workbooks or to discuss during supervision


The Children Act 1989:

S1(a) (The Welfare Principal) is a very useful reference when making decisions regarding young people. ‘The Child’s Welfare shall be The Court’s Paramount Consideration’ S31 Care Orders and S20 Accommodated children


The Children Act 2004:

And associated publications builds on the concept of Every Child Matters, (Change for Children) and the 5 outcomes for children that everyone working with young people should be trying to achieve. Remember SHAPE
Stay safe
Healthy
Achieve
Positive contribution
Economic wellbeing

The Act and associated publications also provides guidance regarding multi-agency roles and responsibilities within the Safeguarding and Promoting the Welfare of Children (SAPW) / Child Protection and the Common Assessment framework (CAF)


Working Together to Safeguard Children. HM Government (2006):

This document sets out how organisations and individuals should work together to safeguard and promote the welfare of children. It states a range of procedures and responsibilities for all of those that are working with young people and places an emphasis on multi-agency responsibility All agencies should have a copy of this document


Care Standards Act 2000:

Established a new, independent regulatory body for social care and private and voluntary healthcare services (care services) in England to be known as the National Care Standards Commission (now OFSTED)
CSA (2000) s23(1) National Minimum Standards and associated guidance including Children’s Homes Regulations, DH (2002) outlines the standards required for children’s homes and includes a standard for Child Protection Procedures and Training s17
It also requires independent Councils to register social care workers, set standards in social care work and regulate the education and training of social workers in England and Wales. It provides for the Secretary of State to maintain a list of individuals who are considered unsuitable to work with vulnerable adults


Sexual Offences Act 2003:

Is a highly relevant piece of legislation and introduces a range of new sexual offences and legal ages of responsibility. Of paramount significance is the principal age of some sexual offences being if the victim is below 18 and the perpetrator/s are over 18.
The Act also includes a range of sexual offences and ages of consent and responsibility regarding people in a position of trust and offences of abusing children through prostitution or pornography. (Of particular interest is the Act’s definition of prostitution)


Human Rights Act 1998:

People’s rights are important and should be taken into consideration
Young people have a range of rights that should be considered and if believed to be in the best overall interest, should be promoted. However when making decisions, young people’s welfare should be the most significant influencing factor (Children Act 1989, S1)


Child Development, Vulnerability and Allegations:

All children who have experienced difficult experiences that have resulted in developmental difficulty are vulnerable. Young people with special needs are particularly vulnerable as are looked after children

Children’s developmental and functional difficulties may result in a range of behaviours that are considered to be difficult to manage. These may include verbal or physical aggression or making allegations against adults and other young people

Adults who work with vulnerable young people must have a reasonable understanding of the young peoples functioning and of safe care preventative strategies. (Prevention is better that cure) When allegations are made against other young people or staff they must be carefully considered and any decisions and actions informed by other relevant information, including legislation, policy and procedures



Complaints and representations:
Be clear regarding your agency’s and other agency’s complaints and representations policies and procedures and follow them if required. They may save you and others considerable time and difficulties in the long run


Consultation and accountability:

It is crucial that all staff who work with young people are aware of their individual and corporate levels of responsibility and accountability. This will often inform the level of decisions that individuals will be or should be required to take. If you are unsure, gain advice

Whatever your level of experience, qualification or position within the organisation, consultation is a crucial aspect of Safeguarding and Promoting the welfare of young people and adults and of safe care

All workers should be fully aware of their line of consultation and must consult whenever required according to their level of accountability or are unsure of a situation or decision
Consultation and accountability issues should be integrated within the overall supervision policy


Decision making:

Is a very complex process and is influenced by a range of factors. Levels of decision making and accountability are often linked, therefore be clear regarding what is required from you within your position and your agency. Try to develop well-informed and reasoned decisions and always make written records of any decisions

Making ‘the right decision’ is often a matter for professional dilemma, as we do not want to be seen as ‘getting it wrong’. Strive to understand your own decision-making processes, influences and areas of competence and potential weakness. Sorry, but we do not always get it right, whatever ‘right’ is


Multi-Agency co-ordination and co-operation:

All professionals that are employed to work with vulnerable people should have a common direction for their work and whenever possible should be working towards the same agreed objectives

Residential and fostering seniors and managers have some responsibility for their own and other staff roles and actions within the multi-agency prospective

You and your centre / home may be a significant factor within the Common Assessment Framework (CAF). If you are required to be part of the CAF process, it is crucial that you clarify expectations and roles and agree with other professionals and the young person what work will be undertaken and what information will be recorded

You all have a Local Safeguarding Children Board ‘LSCB’ (was Area Child Protection Committee ‘ACPC’) and there should be a clear process for you to consult with others if you are concerned regarding the welfare of a young person. If you are of the view that you do not receive the level of service that you require from other agencies, raise it during supervision and agree what actions you will be taking. You could make a representation to the local LSCB if required


Policies and procedures:
Policies and procedures are there to assist and at times protect young people and adults and ensure those individuals and agencies are undertaking the roles and responsibilities that are expected of them. Be aware of them, keep updated and follow them and if you are unclear gain advice

Policy and procedure updating should be integrated within the overall supervision policy


Recording and reporting:

Is a crucial aspect of CP / Safeguarding and Promoting young people’s welfare and overall child care practice and all incidents involving young people should be recorded. If you are of the view that a young person may be at risk of harm, always record your concerns, the outcome of any consultations and actions undertaken. Always sign, date and possibly time and co-sign the records if required and believed to be appropriate. Remember the importance of confidentiality and that information should only be shared on a need to know basis. If you are unsure who to share information with, consult with your senior / other

Supervisors and Managers should review recording on a regular basis and address both positives and shortfalls within supervision


Risk Assessments:

Are a significant factor when caring for vulnerable people, especially when caring for people that display a range of behaviours that are a potential risk to themselves or others

Risk assessment usually direct further actions and strategies. Whenever possible develop your assessment findings from reliable and well-informed information. In certain circumstances risk assessments may be a complex and somewhat lengthy process. However prolonged intellectualising may act to block the decision making process


Roles and Responsibilities:

As with accountably, be aware of you own and others roles and responsibilities and those of your agency and others

Supervision is a crucial aspect within the care and safeguarding profession. This should be reflected within company policies and practices


Self Awareness:

Is a significant factor within the safeguarding process for both young people and adults

Try to be aware of your functioning, especially any areas of potential vulnerability. If there are areas that you believe it may be helpful to change address these within supervision. This is not a weakness and should not be seen as such. Personal change is part of our overall professional development. We are not all highly proficient in all aspects of our work, it is simply not possible


Signs, Symptoms and Consequences of abuse and neglect:

Be aware of them and give careful consideration to what may be happening to the young people within your care and their families. Signs and symptoms do not necessarily indicate that a young person is at risk, but they may. Consult and consider a range of information if you have any concerns regarding young people


Team Working and Development:

Teams are not a static process and continue to change due to a range of influencing factors, including: individuals, policy and procedure, financial and other influences

As supervisors and managers you have some responsibility for the overall functioning of your teams. In my experience inclusive practice is of benefit to overall team functioning and establishes ownership and responsibility

Safeguarding the welfare of young people is of paramount importance to your overall organisation functioning and should be addressed at an individual, team and agency level on a regular basis

There are occasions when teams have difficulties for a range of reasons. If you are unable to resolve difficulties at a team level, take consultation at a higher level and consider using external assistance if required


Values and Social Norms:

Are a significant influence for all involved within the child care profession. They influence individuals, teams and agencies and are complex and complicated. We are all different and our differences can cause difficulties when caring for vulnerable people, especially young people

Take care, we are influenced by a range of factors and difference should be addressed during supervision and team level if required





We hope that you have found some of the information useful and will continue to develop this site to provide an increasing support service for carers and social care agencies


© Saffrey, J. (2008 - 9)